SOS is working in cooperation with Naturaland Trust and other partners to create a demonstration site for agricultural best management practices to help control sediment runoff. The site is situated near Slater-Marietta and is leased for crop production. The future extension of the Swamp Rabbit Trail bisects the property, making it an ideal location for a demonstration project.

crops grown using best management practices
Newly installed sediment settling basins and rock stabilization around culverts.

 

Best Management Practices (BMPs) installed during the first phase of work included:

  • 1,500-foot riparian buffer of native trees, shrubs, and perennial pollinator plants along Railroad Creek, a tributary to the North Saluda River
  • 1,300 feet of rock access roads
  • Sediment catchment basins above drainage ditch outfalls
  • A 600-foot grass swale in a primary drainage ditch between the new rock access roads
“The North Saluda River is an important source of drinking water but is also one of the cradles of locally-sourced food for the Upstate. As our region continues to grow, we will need further access to clean water and healthy local food.” - Mac Stone, Executive Director, Naturaland Trust

These projects were funded with support from Michelin, the U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resource Conservation Service, Trees Greenville, Naturaland Trust, Save Our Saluda, and other partners. We are currently seeking funding for the second phase of BMP projects and for ongoing maintenance needs.

 

IMG 3669Volunteers planted over 300 native hardwood trees to enhance the riparian buffer next to Railroad Creek, a tributary to the North Saluda River.

 

IMG 4290 Newly installed rock access roads surrounding a ditch where a grass swale is becoming established.

 

IMG 4622The grass swale helps filter sediment from runoff from the fields. 

 

IMG 5081A cover crop was planted after tomatoes were harvested to help hold soil in place, enhance infiltration, and improve soil health.

 

IMG 4918 Fall pollinators blooming in the newly enhanced riparian area next to the creek.